FDA Registration

The Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System, also known as the Harmonized System (HS) of tariff nomenclature is an internationally standardized system of names and numbers to classify traded products. It came into effect in 1988 and has since been developed and maintained by the World Customs Organization (WCO) (formerly the Customs Co-operation Council), an independent intergovernmental organization based in Brussels, Belgium, with over 200 member countries. The HS is organized into 21 sections, which are subdivided into 99 chapters. The 99 HS chapters are further subdivided into 1,244 headings and 5224 subheadings. Section and Chapter titles describe broad categories of goods, while headings and subheadings describe products in more detail. Generally, HS sections and chapters are arranged in order of a product's degree of manufacture or in terms of its technological complexity. Natural commodities, such as live animals and vegetables, for example, are described in the early sections of the HS, whereas more evolved goods such as machinery and precision instruments are described in later sections.

FDA (FFR) (FCE) Registration (Food and Drug Administration):

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) USA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. The FDA also provides accurate, science-based health information to the public.

We helps you to register in FDA (FFR- Food Facility Registration) and (FCE- Food Canning Establishment).

FDA For Human Food:

Imported foods must be pure, wholesome, safe to eat, produced under sanitary conditions, and contain informative and truthful labeling in English. FDA does not certify, license, or otherwise approve individual food importers, products, labels, or shipments prior to importation.

FDA For Animal Feed:

The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Veterinary Medicine monitors and establishes standards for feed contaminants, approves safe food additives, and manages the FDA’s medicated feed and pet food programs.

FDA For Cosmetics:

Under U.S. law, cosmetic products and ingredients do not need FDA approval before they go on the market. The one exception is color additives (other than coloring materials used in coal-tar hair dyes), which must be approved for their intended use. Companies and individuals who market cosmetics have a legal responsibility to ensure the safety of their products. In order to take action for safety reasons against a cosmetic on the market, we need reliable information showing that it is unsafe when consumers use it according to the directions in the labeling or in the customary or expected way.

Translate »